Healthy Recipes: Salsa

Salsa Image - Masterfile

The word salsa, to most people, conjures up a taste image of something spicy. And, in fact, most salsas do have some spicy component. However, the word simply means sauce and you can leave out, or modify, the spicy heat in these homemade salsas.

Most fresh salsas need to be consumed fairly soon after they are made. This is especially true of the Banana-Kiwi Salsa, because there is an enzyme in kiwi (called actinidin) that will turn the other salsa ingredients mushy if they are left to sit together for too long.

Banana-Kiwi Salsa

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon allspice
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 bananas, diced
1 large red bell pepper, diced
2 kiwifruit, peeled and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the lime juice, brown sugar, salt, allspice, and cayenne. Add the bananas, bell pepper, and kiwi, and toss to combine. Makes 3 cups

From the Johns Hopkins Cookbook Library—Recipes for Weight Loss

Nutritional analysis per 1/2 cup: 70 calories, 0.4g total fat (0.1g saturated), 0mg cholesterol, 2g dietary fiber, 18g carbohydrate, 1g protein, 98mg sodium.A good source of: potassium, vitamin B6, vitamin C

Citrus Salsa

2 large pink grapefruits
1 navel orange
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon minced crystallized ginger
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

  1. Remove the peel and white pith from the grapefruits and orange. Working over a bowl, cut out the sections from between the membranes, letting them drop into the bowl.
  2. Squeeze the juice from the membranes of the orange and 1 of the grapefruits into the bowl. Cut the grapefruit and orange sections into bite-size pieces.
  3. Stir in the honey, vinegar, crystallized ginger, and basil. Makes 2 cups

From the Johns Hopkins Cookbook Library—Recipes for Weight Loss

Nutritional analysis per 1/2 cup: 92 calories, 0.2g total fat (0g saturated), 0mg cholesterol, 2g dietary fiber, 24g carbohydrate, 1g protein, 3mg sodium.A good source of: vitamin C

Corn Salsa

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon mint jelly
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 1/2 cups frozen corn kernels, thawed and drained
2 plum tomatoes, diced
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 scallion, thinly sliced

In a large bowl, stir together the lime juice, mint jelly, salt, and cayenne. Add the corn, tomatoes, bell pepper, and scallion, and toss well. Chill until serving time. Makes 3 cups

From the Johns Hopkins Cookbook Library—Recipes for Weight Loss

Nutritional analysis per 1/2 cup: 61 calories, 0.5gtotal fat (0.1g saturated), 0mg cholesterol, 2g dietary fiber, 15g carbohydrate, 2g protein, 198mg sodium.A good source of: vitamin C

Spicy Pea Guacamole

It’s pretty hard to resist guacamole, but it is a good idea when you’re trying to watch your fat and calorie intake. Here’s a recipe that mimics the color, texture, and seasonings of a real guacamole, but with a fraction of the fat. The secret ingredient is green peas, which have not only a lovely green color and a smooth texture, but a handsome amount of the heart-healthy B vitamin folate.

2 packages (10 ounces each) frozen peas, thawed
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream
1 pickled jalapeño pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt1 small red onion, finely chopped
1/2 cup chopped cilantro

  1. In a food processor, combine the peas, lime juice, sour cream, jalapeño, and salt, and puree until smooth.
  2. Transfer to a serving bowl and stir in the red onion and cilantro. Makes 8 servings

From the Johns Hopkins Cookbook Library—Recipes for Weight Loss

Nutritional Analysis per serving 66 calories, 0.6g total fat (0.3g saturated), 1mg cholesterol, 4g dietary fiber, 11g carbohydrate, 4g protein, 237mg sodiumA good source of: folate, thiamin, vitamin C

Publication Review By: the Editorial Staff at HealthCommunities.com

Published: 18 Aug 2010

Last Modified: 12 Jan 2015