If you can’t find dates, use regular or golden raisins instead.

Rome Apple - Jupiter ImagesIngredients

½ cup old-fashioned rolled oats

⅓ cup pitted dates, finely chopped

3 tablespoons maple syrup

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped walnuts

4 large baking apples, such as Rome or Cortland (8 ounces each)

¾ cup apple juice

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a medium bowl, combine the oats, dates, maple syrup, and walnuts.

2. Core each apple from the stem end going down to within ½ inch of the blossom end. With a vegetable peeler, remove ¾ inch of the peel around the opening created by the corer at the stem end. Stuff the date-nut mixture into the hollow core of each apple. Place in a baking dish just large enough so the apples fit snugly in a single layer.

3. Pour the apple juice into the baking pan. Cover with foil and bake, basting the apples with the pan juices once, for 50 minutes, or until the apples are soft and tender but not falling apart. Serve drizzled with the pan juices. Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts

per serving
calories 294
total fat 3.5g
saturated fat 0.5g
cholesterol 0mg
dietary fiber 9g
carbohydrate 68g
protein 3g
sodium 4mg
 

Good source of: fiber, potassium, vitamin C, vitamin E

KITCHEN tip

Not all apples are suitable for baking. Some varieties have such a soft texture or so thin a skin that if you baked them, they would simply collapse into a heap. Rome and Cortland are two classic “baking apples.” But there are lots of apple varieties out there, so it may be a matter of experimentation to find other types that work well for baking. Some apples that are not good bakers are McIntosh, Red Delicious, and Macoun.

If you are carefully watching your sodium, be sure to read this before preparing this recipe: Sodium Intake and Salt in Recipes

From The Johns Hopkins Cookbook Library: Recipes for a Healthy Heart, edited by Simeon Margolis, M.D., Ph.D. and Lora Brown Wilder, Sc.D., M.S., R.D.

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Published: 20 Oct 2011

Last Modified: 03 Nov 2011