Shallots have a delicate flavor caught somewhere between onion and garlic, but subtler than either. Shallots always add a nice touch to dishes, but they can be hard to find, difficult to peel, expensive, or all three. If you’d prefer not to use a shallot here, use 1 scallion, thinly sliced.

Ingredients

2 teaspoons vegetable oil, such as olive or canola oil

1 shallot, minced

1 yellow summer squash (8 ounces), halved lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise

1/2 pound sugar snap peas, strings removed

1 package (10 ounces) frozen peas

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon tarragon

Directions

1. In a large nonstick skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the shallot and cook until tender, about 2 minutes.

2. Add the yellow squash and cook, stirring frequently, until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes.

3. Stir in the sugar snaps, peas, lemon zest, salt, and tarragon, and cook, stirring frequently, until the sugar snaps and squash are tender and the peas are heated through, about 5 minutes. Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts

per serving
calories 110
total fat 2.8g
saturated fat 0.4g
cholesterol 0mg
dietary fiber 6g
carbohydrate 17g
protein 6g
sodium 337mg
 

Good source of: fiber, folate, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamin B6, vitamin C

Kitchen Tip

Sugar snap peas are completely edible, except for the tough string that runs down the inside (curved) part of the pod. To string a sugar snap, grab the blossom end (the end with the stem) and pull down, as if you were unzipping a zipper. The string should start to pull away from the pod naturally. In larger sugar snaps, there may be a tough string running down the outer side of the pod as well.

If you are carefully watching your sodium, be sure to read this before preparing this recipe: Sodium Intake and Salt in Recipes

From The Johns Hopkins Cookbook Library: Recipes for a Healthy Heart, edited by Simeon Margolis, M.D., Ph.D. and Lora Brown Wilder, Sc.D., M.S., R.D.

Publication Review By: the Editorial Staff at Healthcommunities.com

Published: 20 Oct 2011

Last Modified: 24 Mar 2015