Here are some helpful tips from then National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute on lowering your salt intake:

  • Buy fresh, plain frozen, or canned "with no salt added" vegetables.
  • Use fresh poultry, fish, and lean meat, rather than canned or processed types.
  • Use herbs, spices, and salt-free seasoning blends in cooking and at the table.
  • Cook rice, pasta, and hot cereals without salt. Cut back on instant or flavored rice, pasta and cereal mixes, which usually have added salt.
  • Choose "convenience" foods that are lower in sodium. Cut back on frozen dinners, mixed dishes such as pizza, packaged mixes, canned soups or broths, and salad dressings—these often have a lot of sodium. Choose ready-to-eat breakfast cereals that are lower in sodium too.
  • Rinse canned foods, such as tuna, to remove some sodium.
  • When available, buy low- or reduced-sodium, or no-salt-added versions of foods. Low sodium foods contain 140 mg or less sodium per serving. Reduced sodium foods contain at least 25 percent less sodium than the original product.
  • Reproduced from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

    Reproduced from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

    Additional Sources:

    CDC. "Vital Signs: Food Categories Contributing the Most to Sodium Consumption — United States, 2007–2008" Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm61e0207a1.htm?s_cid=mm61e0207a1_w Accessed on: February 10, 2012.

    FDA. "Code of Federal Regulations Title 21." Available at http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=101.61 Accessed on February 15, 2012.

    Publication Review By: the Editorial Staff at Healthcommunities.com

    Published: 01 May 2009

    Last Modified: 13 Jul 2013