If it seems like a lot of trouble to trim a fresh pineapple for this dessert, try to find already cored and sliced fresh pineapple in the supermarket. Pineapple Image - Jupiter Images

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup fat-free sour cream
  • 6 tablespoons maple sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 3/4 teaspoon cardamom
  • 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 4 cups fresh pineapple chunks

Directions

1. In a small bowl, stir together the sour cream and 2 tablespoons of the maple sugar. Refrigerate until serving time.

2. In a large bowl, stir together the remaining 4 tablespoons maple sugar, the ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves. Add the pineapple to the bowl and toss well to coat.

3. Preheat the broiler. Spray the broiler pan with nonstick cooking spray. Lift the pineapple from any juices that have accumulated in the bowl and thread the chunks onto 8 skewers.

4. Broil 4 to 6 inches from the heat for 6 minutes, turning the skewers over midway and brushing the pineapple with any juices in the bowl, until the pineapple has caramelized. Serve with the maple cream. Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts

per serving
calories 164
total fat 0.8g
saturated fat 0.1g
cholesterol 0mg
dietary fiber 2g
carbohydrate 39g
protein 3g
sodium 29mg

good source of: vitamin C

Kitchen Tips

Once a pineapple has been picked, it will not continue to ripen, so it’s important to choose one in prime condition at the market. Unfortunately, most of the traditional “secrets” to selecting this fruit are unreliable. You can’t judge the fruit by its color (it can range from green to yellow-gold depending on the variety), or by thumping it to test its “soundness,” or by pulling a crown leaf to see how loose it is. The fruit should be firm and plump, as well as heavy for its size, with fresh-looking green leaves. Look out for bruises or soft spots, especially at the base. Never buy a pineapple with a sour or fermented smell. Ultimately, your best guide to quality is a label or tag indicating that the pineapple was jet-shipped from the grower.

From The Johns Hopkins Cookbook Library: Recipes for Weight Loss, edited by Lawrence J. Cheskin, M.D. and Lora Brown Wilder, Sc.D., M.S., R.D.

Publication Review By: the Editorial Staff at HealthCommunities.com

Published: 08 Sep 2011

Last Modified: 30 Mar 2015